The Road to Excellence

Written By Rosemary Carstens      

IN A QUIET VILLAGE 23 MILES SOUTH of Santa Fe, New Mexico, in the vast reaches of the Galisteo Basin, artist Woody Gwyn creates extraordinary portraits of all that surrounds him. He makes his home in this region of gently rolling terrain, piñon pine, juniper, grasslands, prickly pear cactus, yucca and more, daily exploring its subtle beauty. The Galisteo River, lined…

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A Natural Fit

Written By Corinne Garcia      

IT WASN'T LONG AFTER KAY JONES STEPPED FOOT INTO her Jackson Hole, Wyoming, home that she realized she was there to stay. Kay and her husband, Bill, who is now deceased, lived in Dallas, Texas. They discovered the Jackson area years before and rented a home until stumbling on the perfect lot to build their second home… that is, until they…

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Breathing Life into Canvas

Written By Russell Rowland      

WHEN EZRA TUCKER WAS A SMALL BOY in Memphis, Tennessee, he became obsessed with zoologist Marlin Perkins and “Mutual of Omaha’s Wild Kingdom.” Thanks to that television show, Tucker began to haunt the local library, searching for images of various animals in motion. His parents were subsistence farmers who moved to the city, so they weren’t particularly encouraging when Tucker…

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Into the Field

Written By Gussie Fauntleroy      

WHEN WE THINK OF AN ARTIST'S STUDIO, we imagine a well-used space, often with good northern light and room for canvas, paint, clay, brushes and whatever other equipment might be needed for the act of artistry. We probably don’t imagine it being on wheels. But for some artists, traveling to their chosen subject with more than a camera or sketch…

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The Leanin’ Tree Museum Bids Farewell

Written By Laura Zuckerman      

IN THE SCHEME OF THINGS, the endeavors by individuals that benefit society have intrinsic and lasting value. Such is the legacy of Ed Trumble, the man, the power and the vision behind the Leanin’ Tree Museum of Western Art, which closed for good this past August after more than 40 years of serving the broader community in Boulder, Colorado. Trumble’s…

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A New Angle

Written By Laurel Delp       Photography By Charles Davis Smith      

THE SALE STREET HOUSE, designed by Bernbaum-Magadini Architects working with Neal Stewart Designs, is built on a deep, narrow lot (50 by 250 feet) with a 10-foot grade. On one side, a four-story condo complex was slated to be built, although the rest of the old Dallas neighborhood was mostly small, wooden dwellings. “The site dictated what we could do…

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Artistry at Altitude

Written By Steve Phillips       Photography By Richard Springgate      

AN INHABITABLE WORK OF ART in Park City, Utah, clings to a mountainside at 7,200 feet above sea level. The home hovers a thousand feet above sprawling Jordanelle Reservoir, offering breathtaking views of the Uinta Mountains which parallel the distant Wyoming border. The homeowners, empty nesters from Houston, Texas, wanted a second home at a ski resort somewhere in the…

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A Centennial in the Hallowed Halls of Salmagundi

Written By Todd Wilkinson      

THOMAS MORAN WAS AT THE HEIGHT OF HIS EARTHLY REPUTATION — 78 years old and still a decade shy of passing into the twilight of artistic immortality. Half his lifetime earlier, Moran had gone west from New York City to chronicle the fading frontier for posterity, his works momentously forming the basis for Congress setting aside Yellowstone as the first national…

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Beyond Cowboys

Written By Todd Wilkinson      

THERE IS A STORY, PERHAPS APOCRYPHAL, that once upon a time the late and legendary American painter Andrew Wyeth was standing next to a bystander who, in turn, had been attracted to Wyeth’s portrayal of an old, white Brandywine River Valley farmhouse. The work hung on the wall in front of them. Without knowing it was Wyeth himself nearby, the…

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East Meets West

Written By Michele Blackwell       Photography By Michael Woodall      

JASON SCOTT'S JOURNEY TO HIS HOME began thousands of miles away and spanned two decades. During the process, he uncovered antique treasures from the Indonesian island of Java, found a creative passion and began a lasting affiliation with a community of craftsmen. His unique residence, nestled in the sloping ponderosa forest of Flagstaff, Arizona’s high desert, stands as the capstone of…

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The Art of Justice

Written By John Goekler      

IF, AS VINCENT VAN GOGH SAID, there is truly nothing more artistic than to love people, Santa Fe, New Mexico, artist Erin Currier is at the pinnacle of her profession. “I’m most inspired by human beings and the human world,” she says. “One thing all my subjects share is that I admire and respect each of them for many different…

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One Man’s West

Written By Myrna Zanetell      

DESPITE BEING ONE OF THE MOST SOUGHT AFTER ARTISTS IN THE COUNTRY, success has never diminished Martin Grelle’s sense of gratitude to those who “brung him.” Proof of this was his dedication to a friendship with Ray Johnson, owner of the Overland Gallery of Fine Art in Scottsdale, Arizona, his exclusive gallery for nearly three decades. “I truly enjoyed working…

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Unsettled

Written By Corinne Garcia      

STORIES ABOUND OF THOSE WHO "SETTLED" IN THE WEST, and by all accounts, it was anything but easy. After arduous journeys, families took what they could, in many cases a barren patch of land no one before them had claimed for good reason. Perhaps it is because of this hardship that the West holds an allure for many, a romanticized vision…

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An Artist’s Point of View

By Rose Fredrick      

THE TOWN OF SILT, COLORADO, where the artist Dan Young lives and works, is situated on the Roan Plateau near some of the most dramatic land formations found in the Rockies: the Book Cliffs and Flat Tops, the Grand Hogback, Mamm Creek and Storm King Mountain. Despite this, his favorite place to paint is a flat, scrubby, former cow pasture that…

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From the East and of the West

Written By Russell Rowland      

There are artists who feel as if they are entitled to whatever success they have, because they have a strong sense of their talent. And then there are people such as Huihan Liu, a man whose humility and gratitude for having the opportunity to make a living as an artist is contagious. Liu grew up in China, where he was…

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Ethereal Mid-Century Modern

Written By Shari Morrison      

IT ALL BEGAN WITH A PAINTING.  Linda Usher fell in love with a beautiful work by artist Keiko Hara. The triptych pays homage to Claude Monet’s Water Lilies at the Metropolitan Museum of Art and stretches in height more than 6 feet, mimicking the iconic work in its large size. Rich hues of blue and green are dotted with fragments…

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A Record of Industry

By Rose Fredrick      

IN A BETHLEHEM, PENNSYVANIA, CEMETARY, on a gray, sleety morning, Joe Paquet stood working at his French easel. The cemetery offered the best view of the subject Paquet had come to paint: a shuttered steel factory, silent as the grave markers surrounding him. As he painted in the numbing cold, Paquet became aware of an elderly man who had stopped…

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Crow Fair Ranch

Written By Gussie Fauntleroy       Photography By Blake Mistich      

WHEN PJ AND BOBBY HILLIN'S HOME in Hill Country near Fredericksburg, Texas, was part of a home tour last Christmas, the tour bus driver told PJ there were three things he heard visitors mention when they reboarded the bus: the butler’s pantry, the garden and the sanctuary room.  Each space represents an aspect of PJ’s distinct vision for what would become…

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Grounded in History

Written By Steve Winston      

TURN-OF-THE-CENTURY TAOS, NEW MEXICO, hardly seemed the type of place to spark an art revolution. It was a dusty, isolated, frontier outpost… in a territory that wasn’t even a state yet. Within just a few years, however, this sleepy old village metamorphosed into one of the greatest art towns in America. And Joseph Henry Sharp [1859–1953] and Eanger Irving Couse…

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History’s Palette

Written By Rosemary Carstens      

TELEVISION TODAY BRINGS US ONE SERIES AFTER ANOTHER featuring forensic scientists solving crimes. But forensic science also plays an important role in solving mysteries in the art world. It can expose forgeries and reveal the fascinating methods of ancient masters and the rare and unusual pigments they used. An art materials repository, the Straus Center for Conservation and Technical Studies is…

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Architectural Artistry

Written By David M. Brown      

FOR THE SYMINGTON FAMILY, their home in Paradise Valley, Arizona, is the beginning of each day’s journey and the end. Here, they welcome the opportunities offered by the sunrise and the refuge of sunset.  John Symington is a hiker, and he and his wife, Marcella Billups Symington, envisioned their home as a celebration of their passions: heirloom antiques, artwork and…

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Multicultural Modernism

Written By Carter G. Walker      

KHARLENE BOXENBAUM KNOWS WHAT SHE LIKES and she doesn’t mince words. “Unless horses are going in, I think garages are really terrible,” she says.  Suitably, the garage in her Beverly Hills home is underground, and unseen. A victory for the artist, the sacred over the profane. A contemporary painter and devotee of mid-century design, Boxenbaum was equally precise about what…

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The Prix de West Creating New Traditions

Written By Myrna Zanetell      

IF THERE IS ONE COMMONALITY among Prix de West artists, it is that each of their sculptures and paintings tells a story that deepens and enriches the tradition of Western art. Some of these are historical in nature, others record vignettes of daily life, while many of the most touching are simply told by capturing the beauty of the natural world.…

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Turning 30 with Andy Warhol

Written By Richard Polsky      

ON MAY 17, 2017, the National Museum of Wildlife Art, located in Jackson Hole, Wyoming, will open an exhibition of Andy Warhol’s Endangered Species prints to kick off its 30th anniversary celebration. Despite boasting a diverse collection of some 5,000 works of wildlife art, there’s nothing like a Warhol show to generate buzz and bring in an audience. Warhol’s group…

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Creative Space

Written By Corinne Garcia       Photography By Dror Baldinger      

THEY SAY THE EYES ARE THE WINDOWS TO THE SOUL, but perhaps the home is as well. At the very least, it is a reflection of the spirit and essence of those who reside there, and Jene and Jean Lamans’ San Marcos, Texas, residence is a prime example.  Their home is a reflection of a love of craftsmanship, evident in…

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A Painter of Place

AS WITH MANY ARTISTS FROM THE WEST, Josh Elliott is obsessed with the landscape. It’s difficult not to be when you live in a place such as Montana, a place where you are surrounded by the best nature has to offer.  But also like many artists from the West, Elliott doesn’t consider himself a “Western artist.” “I’m an artist who…

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Welcome Home

Written By Christine Phillips       Photography By Roger Wade      

TUCKED AWAY AT THE END of a pasture on her family’s ranch, Roxie Simpson’s home in Roscoe, Montana, is a welcoming blend of timber, steel, glass and stone. Overlooking the Rosebud River, lined with 100-year-old cottonwood trees, the home was designed with the landscape in mind. “The home sits low on the property where it does not compete with its…

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The Spirit of Old Taos

Written By Gussie Fauntleroy      

IF JERRY JORDAN WAS A BETTING MAN — which he’s not, having grown up in a West Texas Pentecostal churchgoing family — he would never have put down money on the chances of ending up with the life he has. What are the odds of a 16-year-old farm boy wandering through the open door of a painter’s studio — which happened…

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Photographing The West She Knows and Loves

Written By Susan Hallsten McGarry      

IN DOWNTOWN BIG TIMBER, MONTANA, the Grand Hotel is a hub of activities. As you enter the lobby, you “meet” Barbara Van Cleve via one of her large-format photographs displayed prominently behind the vintage registration desk. Wander into the historic saloon and you find an image from her Lady Godiva series behind the bar. Join Van Cleve for a meal…

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This Land is Our Land

Written By Laura Zuckerman      

MORE THAN MANY EXHIBITS, the February opening of Mi Tierra: Contemporary Artists Explore Place, at the Denver Art Museum (DAM), raises questions about the role art plays in social and political dialectics. It also asks if images and multimedia installations chart the course in an eternal quest for American identity. The simple answers are yes and yes. But there is…

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Meeting in the Middle

Written By Eliza Cross       Photography By David Patterson      

IT ALL STARTED WITH A TALL HILL AND A SIX-PACK OF BEER. Corey Larsen, co-owner of Dimension Fine Homes, happened upon a man and a woman stuck on the steep road leading to their Steamboat Springs, Colorado, vacation house. Taking pity on the newlyweds, Larsen loaned them his truck. Later, when the grateful couple dropped by with some beer to…

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On A Wing

Written By Isabelle Walker      

THEY TUMBLE FROM THE SKY, quotidian or miraculous, depending on how you look at them. When you find one on the ground, if from a North American migratory bird, it will be illegal to pick up and keep, but some say it’s still lucky, like a penny, only better. If all white, an angel may be near.  For artist Chris…

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The Eyes Have It

Written By Robert Kaufman      

TRUTH BE TOLD, Glenna Goodacre broke the mold the moment the tenacious artist bucked the advice of her sculpture professor at Colorado College, who suggested she forgo pursuing a career in sculpting because of her inability to visualize in 3-D. Instead, Goodacre realized her artistic talent and, in 1996, having already secured her legacy as one of the world’s most revered…

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