December 2013 | January 2014 Feature Articles



Equus

Written By Michele Corriel      

ALTHOUGH THE HORSE HAS LONG HELD A PLACE IN THE HEARTS AND MINDS OF SCULPTORS, going as far back as ancient Greece with the Four Chariot Horses in marble (575 to 650 BCE), the meaning of the horse has been transformed by time. In Ancient Rome, one of the most famous sculptures, Marcus Aurelius (175 BCE), shows the returning emperor…

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Old World Romance

Written By Laurel Delp       Photography By Lisa Romerein      

THIRTEEN MILES INLAND from the California coast at Oceanside and 40 miles north of San Diego, Cal-a-Vie is a 200-acre campus of undulating hills; sometimes sere and golden, sometimes covered in wildflowers, but always bathed in light, the quality of which is so extraordinary it can stop you in your tracks a dozen times a day.  Terri and John Havens…

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Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art

Written By Kathy Chin Leong      

RISING OUT OF THE WATER LIKE GIANT ARMADILLOS FROM A SCI-FI MOVIE, the modern pavilions of the Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art stand in stark contrast to the rustic wood barns that pepper the Arkansas landscape. Since its opening in late 2011, critics and visitors alike stand amazed by the museum’s striking architecture and monumental collection with treasures by…

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Fluid Design

Written By Rosemary Carstens      

SOME ARCHITECTS THRIVE ON CHALLENGES. The tougher the site, the more adrenaline charges their veins, pushing them to reach new heights. Scott Lindenau, design principal for Studio B Architects, based in Aspen, Colorado, is no exception. Surrounding this stylish Rocky Mountain community are the iconic soaring peaks, ice-blue skies and thickly wooded slopes for which the state is known. And,…

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Altered State

Written By Todd Wilkinson      

BEAUTY IN NATURE: Is it sublime or foreboding and subliminal? Is it real or mirage, fragile or resilient, sacred or profane? Are the images we see before us cause for sensual comfort or alarm? In one of several new Monte Dolack paintings, consider this scene that might easily be mistaken for a portrayal of Yellowstone’s geothermal wonderland — an interpretation…

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A West to Call His Own

Written By Laura Zuckerman      

WHEN CONTEMPORARY WESTERN ARTIST DUKE BEARDSLEY was invited to join a bison drive in his native Colorado, he jumped at the opportunity. A skilled horseman who grew up on a cattle ranch, Beardsley assumed bison would behave much like their domestic cousins. He was wrong. Wranglers spent much of a morning stalking the bison before abruptly riding in unison to push…

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