Fall | Winter 2008 Feature Articles



Mian Situ’s View of the West

IN 1987, YOUNG CHINESE IMMIGRANT MIAN SITU WAS SKETCHING tourist portraits in Vancouver’s Stanley Park for $20 apiece, averaging about 10 a day each summer for four years. So today there could be hundreds of people with an original Situ in a drawer or closet, and they don’t even know it. News flash: Dig that portrait out and dust it off…

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Ignatz Sahula-Dycke (1900-1982)

SMOLDERING POLITICAL TENSIONS IN BOHEMIA at the turn of the 20th century ironically gave rise to one of the West’s most impassioned painters of horses, Indians of the Southwest and cowboys. Ignatz Sahula-Dycke captured the actions of men and women that typified the period in the region he loved, but his path to recording the romance and raw beauty of life…

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Design Icon: Sam Maloof

By Chase Reynolds Ewald       Photography By Gene Sasse      

MUCH HAS BEEN WRITTEN ABOUT LEGENDARY WOODWORKER SAM MALOOF: About his work, which has elevated the simple wooden chair to the sublime; about his generosity of spirit, which has nurtured two or three generations of craftsmen; about his uncompromising commitment to quality, which helped create and define today’s studio furniture movement; and about the extraordinary monument to his vision in…

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The Archie Bray Foundation

Written By Michele Corriel      

BUILT ON THE BONES OF A 100-YEAR-OLD BRICK FACTORY, the Archie Bray Foundation is an international magnet — innovatively fecund, proliferate and as humble as a monastery. The parking area of the Bray is muddy. The buildings, while neat, seem almost randomly located. But then off to the left, shards of color, like springtime sprouts, peek from the dull earth. In…

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Green by Design

Written By Laura Zuckerman      

IN THE MID-1980S, ARCHITECT WILLIAM MCDONOUGH was commissioned by the Environmental Defense Fund to build a headquarters in New York whose construction materials were to be as non-toxic as technology would allow and whose signature traits would include energy efficiency. The 20,000-square-foot structure was a watershed in environmental friendliness for workers and could boast the novel application of sustainable practices…

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Casa de Arte

Written By Seabring Davis      

WHEN TWO PASSIONATE ART COLLECTORS COMMISSIONED Santa Fe architect Robert (Bob) Ritter to design their home, the first thing he asked his clients to do was photograph all the works in their collection. “We told Bob from the beginning that the focal point of this home was the art, but that we also wanted to accommodate the environment,” explained the homeowners.…

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