Fall | Winter 2009 Feature Articles



Denver’s Wild Blue Mustang

LUIS JIMENEZ'S MUSTANG— A MUSCULAR AND WELL-ENDOWED BRIGHT-BLUE FIBERGLASS HORSE rearing up 32 feet into the air — is hard to miss for anyone approaching Denver International Airport. And that’s become a problem for some.  It stands imposingly along the main road to the terminal, a surreal and veritable Mile High equine for the Mile High City. Its presence is especially…

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Park City Modern

Written By Vanessa Chang      

JIM CHRISTOPHER, ANDREW RAMSAY AND THEIR COLLEAGUES at Brixen & Christopher Architects spent a good amount of time walking a windswept swatch of Park City. They surveyed 40-acres of a quiet hillside, hiking between dense scrub oaks to get a feel for the land. They saw the intimate spacing of trees facing south and the cool breezes it carried. This project…

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The Rise and Fall of Drop City

AT THE SITE WHERE SOUTHERN COLORADO'S DROP CITY ONCE STOOD, all evidence of one of the first and most celebrated communes of the 1960s has dropped off the face of the landscape. Once in this rural area known as El Moro, just north of the old mining city of Trinidad, its idealistic young residents had built their own Buckminster Fuller-influenced,…

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Artistic Duality

By Chase Reynolds Ewald      

AS A LONG TIME PAINTER OF THE AMERICAN WEST, Paul Calle is not a capturer of dramatic scenery or a depicter of finely etched Western characters, although his use of Western vistas is masterful and his subjects vividly rendered. Rather, Calle is a storyteller whose main interest is man in the moment. In his depictions of the fur-trader era in…

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A Sculptor’s Sculptor

Written By Laura Zuckerman      

THE MOUNTAINOUS, RIVER-CARVED LANDSCAPE OF HIS NATIVE NAIROVI, KENYA, bears little likeness to the low-lying flatlands of North Texas but the distance between the disparate geography and contrast in cultures is a matter of degree for internationally acclaimed artist Robert Glen. If Glen can claim a legacy in sculpture that stretches beyond the expanses of East Africa and its exotic…

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The Four Matriarchs

Written By Steve Winston      

AS YOU GET CLOSER, IT SEEMS ALMOST TO FLOAT in the distance like a giant mirage … a light-brown mesa baking in the heat, and jutting out 370 feet high and a quarter-mile wide from the high desert west of Albuquerque. Atop this mesa on the Acoma Reservation, the way it is, is the way it was. The people still…

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