Contribute to Western Art & Architecture

Thank you for your interest in Western Art & Architecture, the magazine for art collectors and architecture aficionados across the United States. WA&A approaches its coverage of arts and design from a lifestyle perspective, offering valuable insight for collectors, gallerists, artists, architects, and patrons. All of WA&A‘s features, columns, and photography focus on America’s love affair with the Western visual arts — from the classic Western masters to contemporary trendsetters — in lively, creative communities from Texas to the West Coast. We’re interested in introspective articles by knowledgeable writers and photographers who will approach a story from a new angle and invoke the reader’s passion for art and architecture by evoking a powerful sense of time and place.


QUERY GUIDELINES

WA&A adheres to AP style (with the addition of the serial comma). We strongly recommend that you familiarize yourself with the magazine before sending a query.

Queries are accepted via U.S. mail, but email is preferred (christine@westernartandarchitecture.com). Unsolicited, complete manuscripts are accepted by mail with a self-addressed, stamped envelope if you would like the material returned. Queries should be no longer than one page and should include a focused overview of your subject, an explanation of what makes the story timely (has the artist just won an award, marked a sales record, been collected by a major museum, etc.), a list of potential sources that you will cite in the story, as well as a link to appropriate images. Queries for architects or homes, for example, cannot be considered without a selection of images or a link to images. Queries tied to exhibitions are closely considered but must be sent at least three to four months in advance of the show’s opening.

Queries including typos or grammatical errors are deleted upon receipt. Do not, under any circumstances, send unsolicited original slides or other artwork. We will not guarantee their return. Expect eight to 12 weeks for a response. If you do not receive a response, please follow up by e-mail with Christine Rogel, editor in chief, at christine@westernartandarchitecture.com.

Payments are made upon receipt of a signed contract within 30 days of publication. The editors reserve the right to edit or rewrite any article to suit the magazine’s needs. Major alterations will be discussed with the author whenever possible, and authors can be responsible for making revisions. 

Please note that we have a small staff and often receive an overload of submissions for editorial; allow three months response time to your queries.

SEND TO:

Christine Rogel

Editor, Western Art & Architecture
1050 E. Main Street, Suite 3
Bozeman, MT 59715

or christine@westernartandarchitecture.com

Art and Architecture Features

Artist’s features: There are three to four artists’ profiles in each issue of WA&A. These examine the evolution of the artist, current work, noteworthy achievements, and include interviews with a minimum of two sources in addition to the artist.

Please consider: Why is now the time for this story? Ideally, artist features are tied to an exhibition. With your query, please include information about the artist’s upcoming museum or gallery show. Pitches tied to exhibitions are closely considered but must be sent at least three to four months in advance of the show’s opening.

Articles on architecture; public art; historic art movements; groups of artists creating work around a theme or participating in a group show; contemporary or historical movements within Western art; moments when art and architecture collide; and profiles of breakout fine artists are all of interest.

Length: 800 to 1,500 words


Architecture features: WA&A features two homes in each issue. These are current, architecturally designed, dynamic spaces, that ideally include an art collection throughout the interior.

Please include information on participating parties: architect, interior designer, builder, art consultant, and landscape architect. Where is the home located? What makes it a unique project? When was it completed? Please note if the home was published elsewhere (if so, when and where), and if the homeowners are willing to be interviewed (anonymously or publicly).

We request submissions of previously unpublished architecturally designed homes west of the Mississippi in all styles — from rustic and traditional to contemporary. The homes should include substantial collections of art and photo queries should include a good selection of interiors, exteriors, detail shots and images focusing on the art collection. Please include the name of the architect, art consultant, landscape architect,  interior designer (if applicable) and a note about whether the homeowner(s) have consented to publication. Home features run six to eight pages and generally include seven to 12 images.

Length: 700 to 800 words


“At Home With” Feature: In this architecture/lifestyle feature, a homeowner shares their favorite aspects of their home and their art collection. We’re interested in the homeowners’ perspective and the ways in which they are connected to the architecture and artwork in their home, highlighting specific attributes of each. Previous homeowners include artist Billy Schenck, author T.C. Boyle, artist Glenna Goodacre, and architect Antoine Predock.

Length: 700 to 1,200 words

Photography Guidelines
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OPEN COLUMNS

In the Studio: This column is an intimate portrait of an artist in his or her working space. Our first priority is to find interesting spaces: reclaimed/re-purposed structures (we’ve seen everything from chicken coops to grocery stores); historic structures (some of which were used by famous painters); architecturally designed spaces, etc. Since we understand that the vast majority of artists work in rather industrial spaces, as opposed to beautiful ones, we try to think outside the box with this column. If the space is not beautiful, what makes it interesting? Is the artist’s work impacted by the space and the way he/she uses the space? Is the artist impacted by the surrounding landscape? 

Please include information about upcoming exhibitions and 6 to 10 scouting shots of the studio space. These can be quick cell phone snaps, just some images to provide an idea of the space.

When professional photographed, the images should be compelling and tell the story of how the artist works and what he/she is creating. Submissions should include exteriors, interiors, portrait, working shots, and details. It’s critical that the images reveal a strong sense of place. The column generally runs five to seven pages, and we use seven to 10 images.

Length: 800 to 1,200 words


Perspective: WA&A‘s historical column, “Perspective,” focuses on deceased masters of art and architecture. Timely links to retrospectives, exhibitions, anticipated sales, etc. are appreciated. “Perspective” is a fairly straightforward profile of an important artist, from birth and education through the end of their career and death. Expert sources from museums and galleries should be featured prominently. Past subjects have included Georgia O’Keeffe, Edgar Paxson, Gustave Baumann, Earl Biss, Fritz Scholder, architects Julia Morgan and Robert Reamer. Creative ideas for writing about schools of thought or small groups of artists will be considered.

Length: 1,200 to 1,500 words


Rendering: This column reviews the design philosophy and aesthetic of an architecture firm in the west. It features innovative and well-respected firms with a breadth of work and seeks to establish geographic and stylistic diversity. Although “Rendering” can mention commercial work, the column focuses on (and includes images of) two residential projects. Occasionally, “Rendering” covers a builder, school of thought, or landscape architect.

When submitting a firm for consideration, please include the name of the firm, a contact person and information, and a link to their website and photos. Please confirm that they own the rights to their images and will permit use. Please note if they were featured in another publication recently.

Length: 1,200 words


Collector’s Notebook: WA&A‘s “news you can use” column for collectors includes a sidebar with helpful tips from experts. Past subjects included the preservation of historic textiles, explaining complex artistic processes, tips on authenticating works of art, and the value of fine art prints. Typically, this column includes a hand-drawn illustration.

Length: 1,200 with sidebar


Wanderings: WA&A’s travel column takes readers on a tour of a Western locale. Big cities to tiny towns are considered, but there must be a strong focus on art and architecture at the location. Things to think about: If an art collector were visiting this town for an auction, what else could they do or see? Where should they stay? Find culinary delights? Shop for local goods? Discover new galleries or studios? Find a landmark building? Tour an art museum?

We’ve gone to Tombstone, AZ, and Telluride, CO. Creative structuring of this column is also appreciated. For example, one writer featured a 48-hour drive around Lake Tahoe. Another did a walking tour of public art in Seattle, and another wrote about a road trip to Mesa Verde.

Length: 800 words with an “If You Go” sidebar (contact information for businesses, galleries, restaurants, lodging, and attractions)


Western Landmark: This column features the great hotels and haunts of the West, from historical gems to contemporary architectural wonders. There must be a strong art or architecture focus on the property.

Length: 500 words


Collector’s Eye: This column is a short profile and Q&A with a significant art collector. We cover the spectrum both geographically and professionally by featuring curators, galleries, private collectors, and other collectors from across the country, for example, Jack and Rebecca Benaroya, Scot Levitt, Frankie and Howard Alper, Anna Nolan and Allen Covault.

Length: 1,000 words with Q&A;


Things We Love: WA&A editors are always on the lookout for functional works of art. Spot one? Create one? Send it over! 

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